Tag Archives: tutorial

Spider Web Art Journal Page Process Video

Spider Web Art Journal Page Process Video

I am so excited to share my latest art journal page with you AND a process video(!!!). I love watching other people work and always pick up on new tricks and ideas and just feel like it is fascinating to see someone else’s process. I have put together my 40 minute art journal page process into about 3 and a half minutes for you. Enjoy!

INSPIRATION

I was inspired to create this page last week when I was at a violin concerto and we were sitting in the balcony, looking down over the stage. I noticed that all the hanging mic cables snaked over the stage like a spiderweb and I liked the glow of the lights made them a deep blue, ominous color. I began thinking about how I could make my own spider web in an art journal page and thus this page idea was formed.

To learn more about translating your inspiration into art, take my new course Travel Like An Artist. 

HOW TO CREATE YOUR OWN SPIDER WEB ART JOURNAL PAGE

SUPPLIES:

  • paper or journal
  • acrylic paint
  • matte medium
  • string
  • washi tape

PROCESS:

  1. Thin your paint a bit by adding the matte medium to make it easier to spread
  2. Load your string up with paint by swiping it through the paint like a credit card
  3. Either tape down the string or hold it tightly between your hands
  4. Opt 1: Rub the string across your page (this will make the more muddy lines)
    Opt 2: Tape it down to your table, hold the string tight and pop it by lifting up (like the way they create chalk lines) and rotate it until you are out of paint (creates sharp, thin lines)
    Opt 3: stamp the string down onto the paper by holding it very tightly between your hands (creates a mix of sharp and smudged lines)
  5. Repeat until you have your web!

Spider Web Art Journal Page Process Video

To learn SO much more about art journaling and for access to a library of 100s of tutorials like this one (and way better) join Get Messy today! 

Spider Web Art Journal Page Process Video

RESOURCES/CREDIT:

Music from Miss Peregine’s Home For Peculiar Children Soundtrack

Quote from here

DIY Loom Tutorial

Make your own loom for weaving. For the simple, step by step tutorial with photos click through. As promised, here is my DIY Loom Tutorial. As you may have read in my weaving resources for beginners post, weaving is a new to me, just for fun craft and so far I really, really love it. But! Nothing comes into a crafters life without a little DIYing to begin the whole process. When I decided I finally wanted to try weaving I was held back by the fact that looms are either A) HUGE B) Expensive or C) Impossible (to me) to find in Korea.

So I waited and watched from the sidelines, until I saw this loom and thought, “I can totally make that“. So this summer I picked up all the supplies I would need at hobby lobby for less than $10, my ever indulgent father cut the dowels down to size and then I loaded the supplies up and they and I flew back to Korea, where my wonderful, doting husband built the loom for me! Now I am a happy weaver with a beautiful, DIY loom.

Here is how you too can join me on my mission to weave and watch Parks & Rec all day, every day. Build your own loom for weaving. Simple, step by step tutorial with photos by Lauren-Likes. Click through for tutorial

Supplies: 

Build your own loom for weaving. Simple, step by step tutorial with photos by Lauren-Likes. Click through for tutorial Step 1: Cut your dowel rods down to size. This depends on how big you want your loom to be, so remember you can always make something smaller than your loom but never bigger. I cut mine down to be 12in wide by 16in tall. Any bigger than this and it wont really be a ‘lap loom’.

Step 2: Mark out the spacing for your pegs. I spaced mine at 1/2 an inch, but they are technically closer together since the pegs have a width to them, but we drilled in on the 1/2 inch marks. Build your own loom for weaving. Simple, step by step tutorial with photos by Lauren-Likes. Click through for tutorial Step 3: Draw a line in the middle of your dowel exactly where you want to drill in for the peg placement. Build your own loom for weaving. Simple, step by step tutorial with photos by Lauren-Likes. Click through for tutorial Step 4: Begin drilling! For the 1/4in pegs we used a 1/4in drill bit and wrapped washi tape around the drill where we needed to stop drilling to a) not split the wood/go all the way through  and b) have the pegs sit at the same height. Build your own loom for weaving. Simple, step by step tutorial with photos by Lauren-Likes. Click through for tutorial Step 5: Once all your holes are drilled, sand them down so that the splinters don’t hurt you or snag your yarn. Build your own loom for weaving. Simple, step by step tutorial with photos by Lauren-Likes. Click through for tutorial Step 5: Hammer in your pegs, making sure to hammer them down until they are at an even height and at the bottom of your drilled holes. Build your own loom for weaving. Simple, step by step tutorial with photos by Lauren-Likes. Click through for tutorial Step 6: YAY! You’re so close and its so pretty now and looks like a dinosaur (right?!), do any last-minute sanding clean up you need to. Build your own loom for weaving. Simple, step by step tutorial with photos by Lauren-Likes. Click through for tutorial Step 7: This is the tricky one. You will line up your sides exactly how you want them to sit by stacking your peg sides ON TOP OF the flat sides (this way you can reach underneath while weaving without picking op your loom). In the middle of where they intersect you will mark the middle spots on both and then drill all the way through both of the dowel rods. Build your own loom for weaving. Simple, step by step tutorial with photos by Lauren-Likes. Click through for tutorial Step 8: Now you hammer (with a lot of muscle) a peg all the way through to connect the two rods! Of course you could always use wood glue, but this is more sturdy and a nice touch. Build your own loom for weaving. Simple, step by step tutorial with photos by Lauren-Likes. Click through for tutorial Step 9: Enjoy your loom! You can always stain or paint it to make it look nicer if you would like to, but as long as you sanded it well you are good to begin weaving immediately! DIY-Loom-Tutorial12Now go have fun weaving! I cant wait to see what you make. If you are just getting started, or are looking for more inspiration, check out my last post on weaving resources. 

Build your own loom with this simple step by step tutorial.

#PROGRESS!

DIY-Loom-Tutorial11

Picasa video tutorial

My mom asked me to make her this tutorial and I thought it was a perfect one to share with you guys. I have shared other Fauxtoshop hacks (see what I did there) here and here and you guys really liked them. So I thought I would share another. If you don’t know me well, there are 2 things you need to know. One, I am a cheapscape. Two, I like doing things the easy way. So Photoshop is expensive and hard to learn. (Trust me I’m learning it now, because I got it free on my school computer)

Your dilemna: The cheapest way to print photos is to have 4×6 photos printed at a printer store with a coupon. But how do you print multiple photos on one print? How do you crop your photos to different sizes? How do you get those cute tiny photos everyone has? Using instagram or square cropped photos in your projects is SO fun, but ordering instragram photos is so expensive and kind of annoying.

My solution:   Use Picasa*! Quickly and easily put multiple photos on one 4×6 card in a mass array of different shapes and sizes!

Ok, so watch the video and then come back here for examples of how the photos look in an album and to see the measurements of the actual sizes (because I wasn’t sure of them as I was filming).

I love this technique. I can get such unique sizes of photos this way. The more photos you put on a card, the smaller they get. And when you change the orientation of the background you’re using (the 4×6) this will also change the size. Which I think is fun! So play around with it and see what you come up with. If you know any other Picasa tricks let me know!

Project Life by Lauren Likes

Above: These square photos are about 2.5×2.5 and are my absolute favorite size photos to use in here. They fit perfectly onto the 3×4 cards and take up just enough room to stand alone but not overpower the card. You can get 2 onto one 4×6 photo.

Below: These are the 2×2 photos that you would print 6 of on one card. See how much less room they take up? They are a great way to use embellishments on a card still and to get 6 photos printed onto one 4×6, but I still love those bigger squares. Project Life by Lauren LikesGraduation 119

Above:  These are really fun too. That bottom square photo is about 3×3 and is perfect for the large 4×6 cards. To get these you will only put one square photo on a 4×6 photo in Picasa.

Below: This page is a good example of using the wide photos. They aren’t quite 3×4 but are a good way to get wide photos in and use a card. When making these it just depends on how big you want them to know if you should put one or two onto a card. The more photos you put on a card, the smaller they get. But play around with adding different amounts, sizes and changing the orientation and see how you like them! Graduation 114

 

***Picasa is a free photo editing software that anyone can download.